Archive

Posts Tagged ‘government’

New Book, New Setting, New Universe

February 13, 2016 Leave a comment

I just fired off my newsletter and I still have post pics to my Facebook page and update my personal website. I’ll get to that in a minute though, first I want to write this and get it out there because I can hardly contain my excitement. I teased a new series and concept in a recent blog post. This is the culmination of all that work: Terminus.

The first book in the series has been available for more than a week already but it wasn’t free yet. Now it is. And not only that, but my second book in that setting is also available now. Between that, John M. Davis’s book (Ghost Planet), and the website being published and available – it’s time for the reveal!

Terminus is the name of the setting. It seemed fitting, given how a terminus is an end or a final destination. So it is for the characters in the first few stories in this new setting, but as with any ending, it is also a beginning. A beginning of new lives, new adventures, and new stories we get to tell.

The backdrop is four hundred years into the future, give or take. Humanity has spread to the stars. Even more than that, we’ve been met by aliens and they aren’t so different from us in many ways. Then again, some are – there are a lot of different races out there. So many that we’re not even sure who they all are yet.

We’ve got faster than light travel, we’ve got blaster rifles and pistols (pulsed laser weapons), conventional weapons, massive navies in space, an overreaching central government (called the Continuum) trying to control everything, and hundreds of smaller governments ranging from controlling systems to individual planets that are at odds with one another. Oh, and did I mention the Gifted? They’re a new order of psychics with some wicked and truly unpleasant powers.

Now here’s where John comes in (other than helping to brainstorm and create what we’ve come up with). I whipped up a novella for an introduction to the setting. It’s called Terminus (shocker), and it’s free! It’s actually been out for a little over a week now, but I didn’t want to advertise it until it was available for free. Now it is! But wait, that’s not all! (did you read that in a Billy Mays voice?)

John’s book, Ghost Planet, is also available. And so is my full length novel, Frozen Dreams (book 3 in the series). The way it works is Terminus sets the stage and gets you interested, then Ghost Planet introduces John’s cast of characters that are intertwined with mine. Frozen Dreams happens at the same time as the other two books and ties everything together with my cast of characters. Ghost Planet and Frozen Dreams are not free, sorry, but on the plus side John’s already working on his next book in the series, Fear the Gifted.

There’s a little bit more to Terminus that I haven’t mentioned yet. We love this setting so much, and we know readers will too, so we’re opening it up for contributions. No, we’re not asking you to do our work for us, we’re offering a spot on the Terminus website (http://www.booksofterminus.com) for people to contribute things they’d like to see in it. New planets, new alien races, new technologies or weapons, new characters (good or bad), or just about anything! We can’t promise everything will make it in, but we’ll do our best to work things in and be sure to let you know privately and publicly about the effort.

 

Terminus

Terminus

ghostplanet

Ghost Planet

FrozenDreams_Small

Frozen Dreams

Amazon
Amazon UK
Barnes and Noble
iTunes
Kobo
Scribd
Page Foundry / Inktera
Amazon
Amazon UK
Barnes and Noble
Kobo
Amazon
Amazon UK
Barnes and Noble (coming soon)
iTunes (coming soon)
Kobo
Scribd
Page Foundry / Inktera

That’s it for now, but there’s lots more to come! As I said, John’s hard at work on the next book and both of us have promised 4+ Terminus stories this year. Knowing me, that will probably grow as long as the readers are there. The first two I already wrote were so much fun I tore through them in no time, so I can’t wait to immerse myself in this new setting again and explore it some more.

To learn more about Jason Halstead visit his website to read about him, sign up for his newsletter, or check out some free samples of his books at http://www.booksbyjason.com.

Independence, Author Style

So the government’s shut down, does that mean anarchy reigns? Well, I’m planning on heading into my day job in a few minutes and as far as I know, everything is business as normal. Good thing I didn’t apply for a FHA mortgage or give in when my wife suggested I treat myself to a pistol at the sporting goods store the other day – government loans and gun permits are going to be slowed down by this shutdown, among other things.

So instead the government demands our military and many civilian workers continue to work without pay. Retroactively it’ll be paid back, they say. There’s irony in the phrase, “the cost of freedom.”

So the other kind of independence I can think of is something I don’t talk about as often as I should: independent publishing. I had a few books initially that were released through a publisher, but I wasn’t keen on how that was working out for me so I decided to do my own thing. 40 books later I’m still quite happy with my decision and going strong. Along the way I’ve been helped by another source of independence though, the Independent Author Network (#ian1 for you Twitter-savvy folks).

William Potter is the man behind the machine over at the Independent Author Network. I’m sure I’m not the only one who’s made his life complicated by putting out so many books, but I hit the upper threshold some time ago with having 20 books listed there. He’s offered to swap them out for me if I wanted, but so far I haven’t taken him up on that.

Still, it’s a shame since I’ve got some great new books people may not be seeing. Books like Vitalis: Provenance and the one I’m finishing up this week, Vitalis: Genesis. Or many of my newer fantasy releases in my Blades of Leander trilogy or my Order of the Dragon series. Both have done well with reviews and sales, but they could stand to do much better.

I’ve even dabbled in some espionage, to tie this back into the government overstepping its bounds. My Homeland series is about fighting terrorism and following the lives of special agents working for the Department of Homeland Defense. They’re people too, after all, and just as screwed up as the rest of us.

So, since the sky isn’t falling and your neighbors aren’t stockpiling guns, ammo, and canned goods, why not relax a little and read a book? IAN has hundreds if not thousands of great authors to check out – although I encourage you to start with me first.

To learn more about Jason Halstead visit his website to read about him, sign up for his newsletter, or check out some free samples of his books at http://www.booksbyjason.com.

Where’s the Line?

September 11, 2013 2 comments

In every of just about every other person on the Internet who’s posting something about September 11th, 2001, I’ll do the same. It’s not about fear of forgetting – who could forget such a thing? It’s about honoring those who are gone and those who remain. And in respect of those who remain who were touched by what happened, it’s also about being ever vigilant.

Here’s another question that some may not know. Why should December 7th be an important date? The answer – Pearl Harbor was attacked by the Imperial Japanese Navy as they entered into World War II. Unfortunately, not many of us today realize that date or the significance.

Am I here to bitch or complain? No! I don’t intend to make anybody feel bad either, especially on a day that is already so filled with emotion and memories. I was in between jobs (read: being a bum playing computer games after a morning search of job message boards and websites) when I heard about it. I can’t remember if I contacted my girlfriend or if she contacted me, but it was within moments of the first tower strike. Then I witnessed the second one on the news happen live.

I remember being speechless and stunned. Seeing the smoke and flames was one thing, but seeing it actually happen? That took my breath away. It left me angry and upset. With my rekindled patriotism and the memory of an oath I’d taken when I entered the military, I tried to reenlist. I say tried because they turned me away, citing a bunch of reason that boiled down to the recruiter being too busy and having enough easy pickings amongst all the other people lining up that he didn’t want to do the extra paperwork necessary to get me back in.

But that was me and that was then. If I asked my kids, ages 7 and 4, what was special about today they’d look at me funny and maybe remember something I said or something said at school. They don’t know what happened over a decade ago, just like most of us today don’t really know what happened 72 years ago.

Aside from the media coverage what is the difference between the two events? Both were orchestrated by a group of people willing to sacrifice their own lives for their mission. Both were radically different cultures from our own. Both believed they were doing the right thing. History is written by the victors and on those two days America was not victorious. We rallied in both cases and after considerable time and expense we have been, but that doesn’t mean it won’t happen again. It was a pyrrhic victory at best, because there is no undoing the hurt that was caused.

Our only recourse, as a nation, is to remain ever vigilant. We piss and moan about the infringements on our freedom caused by such vigilance, but how many similar incidents have been thwarted since then by copycat groups or other people with different agendas? We give the president grief over his involvement in the affairs of other nations, but what if a controlled strike against Syria prevented a future attack that caught the US unaware?

Syria has chemical weapons capable of considerable damage. There are other weapons far more devastating out there. Biological agents, for example. It’s scary and it makes me question where the line is drawn. At what point is it okay to interfere with another nation or culture? Does it depend on how big and / or dangerous they are? If Russia or China were to use such things would we do more than talk sternly to them or invoke trade embargoes? I doubt it. We lose our playground bully status when dealing with nations of comparable strength.

I don’t have an answer, just an appreciation for the fact that I’m not in charge for trying to figure out where that line is at. And a never ending desire to remain vigilant and to do what we must to protect ourselves from all threats, domestic and foreign.

To learn more about Jason Halstead visit his website to read about him, sign up for his newsletter, or check out some free samples of his books at http://www.booksbyjason.com.